In this test, there are two names for the server that has international characters in the domain name. The browsers we tested does not show the domain name in UTF8 in the browser when showing the certificate contents, which we think is wrong. If you have a domain with Swedish characters this should be shown – it will be very hard for a user to compare the names otherwise.

Safari 7.1.3 on OS/X complains that the names doesn’t match, while Firefox and Chrome seems to think it matches.

If you write your own client, this kind of domains are translated before being used in DNS or as a HTTPS uri – the DNS only contains ASCII characters. RFC 6281 explains that these names are encoded in the same way in Subject Alt Names in certificates.

These tests should succeed.

 

If you click through with a browser, the web page will give you more links to test – both with pre-encoded domain names in the URL and with UTF8 links in the HREF tags. The URL with the emoji could not be saved in this WordPress configuration (obviously a problem with my MySQL database).

 

Safari shows the encoded names, not the actual names. Maybe a good browser should display both variants.

Safari shows the encoded names, not the actual names. Maybe a good browser should display both variants.

 

Firefox doesn't show the names in human-readable text either.

Firefox doesn’t show the names in human-readable text either.

Next test

tls-o-matic-success


HTTPS